A Story of Faith and Transformation – Clarkston United Methodist Church

by | June 13, 2018

Inspirational stories such as the story of Clarkston United Methodist Church, Clarkston, Michigan, provide encouragement, insights, and motivation. Their clear vision for ministry, hearts full of gratitude for God’s blessings, and willingness to follow God’s leading proved to be a winning combination. Add to the mix competent, capable, and faithful leaders and the story becomes a roadmap to growing generosity and achieving God-sized ministry objectives.

Here is the story of faith and transformation from Clarkston United Methodist Church.

In 2012, when conversations began about values, timing, and next steps, the leaders at Clarkston UMC had already been dealing with the constraints of a space that no longer fit their call to ministry. Their prime location had great potential, but the leaders were cautious to not adopt a “build it and they will come” attitude. Instead of building for building sake, they set out to engage the congregation in meaningful conversations about ministry needs and how to address them. A series of TownHall meetings provided the opportunity for sharing detailed information regarding the plans for expansion and re-purposing of existing space to meet current and future ministry objectives. The entire church community received an invitation to join in the discussion regarding how Clarkston UMC was being called by God to live out its vision.

Clarkston’s leaders began searching for a capital campaign firm that would enable them to fund their project and fulfill God’s vision for ministry. Based on recommendations from other senior pastors and a desire for an organic process that fit their culture, Clarkston UMC chose Horizons Stewardship. Rick Dake, Clarkston UMC’s senior pastor said, “We had not been thriving in the area of stewardship and wanted someone to tow the line with us.” Capital campaign co-chair, Ric Huttenlocher added,

Horizons stood out because of their customized approach.

They took the time to understand us and develop a personalized program.

Following a comprehensive pre-campaign study, Horizons determined Clarkston’s capital campaign was likely to raise between $2.3 million and $3.0 million over the next three years. The projection was based on a review of historical data, meetings with Clarkston’s staff, multiple face-to-face interviews with key church leaders, and an online church member survey. The survey also provided insights into how the campaign process should be designed for the highest degree of effectiveness. Rev. Dake explained,

 Our leaders were deeply involved in making the campaign suitable to our culture.

We were able to step up and embrace the challenging parts, but also empowered to give direction to the process to fit our context.

Over the next several months, the congregation engaged in intentional prayer using a 21-day devotional guide and gathered in various groups and settings to share their questions and enthusiasm for the project. The highlight was Gratitude Sunday which, according to Rev. Dake was “our Good Friday and Easter rolled into one. It was without a doubt a holy time for this congregation. We became unified in our understanding that what we do matters and that we are, in fact, changing lives through this ministry.” The campaign unfolded during Lent, which was, at first a concern for Rev. Dake. “I did not think it was a good idea to conduct the campaign during the holy time of Lent. When I saw the impact the campaign’s spiritual component had, I realized I had been wrong. It turned out to be the best Lent we ever had,” explained Rev. Dake.

Clarkston’s people prayed, gathered, shared, and gave thanks.

They also pledged over $3.3 million to their capital campaign.

Six months prior to the conclusion of the campaign,

they have collected over $3.5 million.

According to Rev. Dake, the capital campaign had a considerable impact in many areas. Rev. Dake said his understanding of generosity shifted beyond simply an adaptation of stewardship language. He clarified,

We have moved the needle in this church and now are able to talk about money in a very different way. Generosity is a spiritual discipline that begins with gratitude and ends with joy. This will be our culture moving forward.

Clarkston United Methodist Church continues to grow in worship, giving, and ministry. Following their successful capital campaign, Clarkston UMC also partnered with Horizons to conduct a Taking the Next Step annual budget campaign. According to Ric Huttenlocher, “We needed to devote the time and energy to helping people understand the meaning of generosity and how to apply generosity principles to their daily lives.”

As a result, Clarkston’s annual giving increased by 13% over the previous year. Also, Clarkston achieved a 46% increase in the number of commitments received.

 

2 Comments

  1. Avatar

    Do you all also work with churches who want to eliminate their debt, in order to begin a foundation for future building needs (we are also in need of additional educational/training space), and our leaders do not want to even talk about another building effort until the current debt is gone. Let me hear back please.

    Reply
    • Kristine Miller

      Hello Rebekah,
      I edited out the specifics of your church as the comment will be public on our site.

      Yes, we do work with churches to reduce or retire debt. Someone from our team will be in touch with you soon!
      Kristine

      Reply

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