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An Enlightening Perspective from Your Investors

I am an Investor. Think of me as a potential venture capitalist for your organization, or as a mission capitalist for your vision. I am not looking to make money back, but I am looking for a real return on my investment. What direction are we going in? How will we...

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How to Conquer Your Fear of the Ask

Most people are downright terrified to ask other people for money. Asking for money seems intrusive, awkward, impolite and uncomfortable. Asking for money can be intimidating, but changing your approach can make it easier---and even fun!   Here are 5 tips for...

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Instead of Despair, Make Giving About God

At some point during the year, despair sets in. Giving is falling behind and expenses are exceeding budget. If something isn't done soon, next year's programs will have to be cut. The ship is sinking quickly. But before despair sets in, consider a different way to...

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An Enlightening Perspective from Your Investors

I am an Investor.

Think of me as a potential venture capitalist for your organization, or as a mission capitalist for your vision. I am not looking to make money back, but I am looking for a real return on my investment.

What direction are we going in? How will we know when we get there? The architect’s picture is nice, but I need an actionable plan, actual milestones, a map. If I am going to get onboard, then I want us to actually get somewhere. As an investor, I need to know where we are headed and how we plan to get there.

An annual report showing successes for last year and your goals for this upcoming year would help me to understand you. What did we learn from where we succeeded, and what did we learn from where we missed? What will we do differently as a result?

Do you have a multi-year plan? Do you have a plan at all? If you want me to buy into our vision, you need to involve me in vision casting. Help me understand our mission-critical long- and short-term goals. What is our end game?

If you have no tangible, measurable goals for your ministries, then how do you make decisions? How do you (or I) know what has been accomplished? Where will you invest resources? How do you know what to build on, what to re-evaluate, what to re-strategize, and what to let go of?

Do you ever tell me what you are really excited about? Do you ever ask me about my passions and what I want to invest in? Show me your heart, then we can have a deeper conversation about my heart.

I love my church and all, but you are not the only Godly gig around.

I also have a responsibility (a calling, if you will), to invest wisely and maximize the return on the investment. What is going to happen … what is going to change … what should I expect to see if I really invest in you? I need to believe you can manage this investment and follow through.

Let’s talk. I don’t mean the sermons – they are great and I believe that stuff too – but let’s really talk… about what this vision is going to take, how we can get there, and how I can make a difference. I might even have a suggestion or two.

You want me to show you the money? OK… but you are going to have to show me some things too. I won’t be all in until you invite me all the way in. Remember, I am an investor in your vision. Help me see how my investment is making a difference.

By the way, I am not the one afraid of talking about investing. I am a grown-up, and I can handle a challenge. Let’s have a real conversation sometime.

 

Horizons welcomes Mick Tune as a guest contributor. Mick is a partner with Doug Turner and Bill McMillan at Culture of Ready, a partner with Horizons in the generosity movement. Reach out to Mick at mtune@horizons.net.

 

 

 

The Importance of Believing in the Great Commission

Stories about outrageous and extravagant generosity inspire me. Just a few weeks ago, an older woman told me how excited and privileged she felt about giving a generous gift to her church’s capital campaign. Vera went on to say, “The truth is Scott, I probably won’t live to see the results. I’m not going to be around much longer.” For Vera, the importance of her gift was not in its impact during her lifetime, but rather the impact it would have on the church in the future. The gift Vera gave would empower her church to act on The Great Commission.

Therefore go and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit, and teaching them to obey everything I have commanded you. And surely I am with you always, to the very end of the age. Matthew 28:19-20.

She was giving an outrageous, extravagantly generous gift for one reason and one reason only—so her church could reach people for years to come with the good news of God’s love and grace. Imagine what our churches would look like if they were filled with people like Vera who believed so thoroughly in the mission of the church—given to us in the Great Commission.

51% of churchgoers have never heard of the Great Commission.

 

A recent poll by Barna Research asked churchgoers, “Have you heard of the Great Commission?” Here are the results:

 

It may be surprising to see that 51% answered, “No.”  It is hard to understand why the majority is unfamiliar with the core mission of the church. However, the research points to a potentially more significant and troubling question–Do churchgoers believe their church makes a lasting and eternal difference in peoples’ lives?  If we truly believe the church and its teachings make a difference, then we are inspired to share our faith and the Great Commission has meaning.

If we don’t believe the Church matters, then the

Great Commission makes no difference.

I met with a church group that was considering a building project. The church told me they were packed with no room for growth. Space was so tight, they decided they couldn’t advertise or invite people to church. The group had called me there to help them decide whether or not they should “do something” about their overcrowded space.  I asked the group, “What would you think about a person who knew the cure for cancer and decided to keep it to himself?” With great indignation, they replied, “That would be criminal!”

 

Then I asked them, “Do you or do you not have the cure for a hurting and broken world? If you do, how can you keep it to yourselves?”

 

Outrageous and extravagant generosity occurs when we truly believe we have the antidote for the diseases that afflict our world. The Great Commission matters when people believe in the importance of sharing the good news of God’s love and grace with the world.

 

So what do we do?

  • Continually and consistently tell stories of how your church’s ministries are making a difference. In every church communication, including your bulletin, newsletter, website, and Facebook page, tell stories of how people’s lives are being changed by your ministry. And if you can’t come up with life-changing stories, it’s time to take a hard look at your ministries and evaluate the quality of your response to the Great Commission.

 

  • Consider a Bible study or sermon series on the book of Acts. Explore the birth and explosive growth of the early church as they lived the Great Commission.   One small church in West Virginia experienced an amazing revival when they spent six months reading and studying the book of Acts. By the end of the study they passionately believed that although they were small, their community desperately needed what they had to offer. And guess what … giving exploded.

 

 

Would you like to experience outrageous extravagant giving in your church? Rather than talking about spreadsheets, budgets and bills, focus on how your church is responding to the Great Commission. How is your church reaching people to share the Good News? How do your ministries demonstrate your mission of sharing Christ with the world? Be willing to ask, “Do we really believe we have the answer to a world that is broken, hurting and afraid?” If the answer is yes, tell your story and get ready for outrageous, extravagant giving! If the answer is no, start looking for the for sale sign.

 

How to Conquer Your Fear of the Ask

Most people are downright terrified to ask other people for money. Asking for money seems intrusive, awkward, impolite and uncomfortable. Asking for money can be intimidating, but changing your approach can make it easier—and even fun!

 

Here are 5 tips for conquering your fear of the ask

  1. Make your donation first.

When asking a donor to support a cause, be sure you are already on the record as having given your support. After all, how can you ask someone to do something you have not already done yourself? Your enthusiasm and commitment should be demonstrated through your early gift to the cause. Your leadership will be an indication to others that the cause is important and worthy of funding. Before asking others, it is essential that your donation (or pledge) has already been made.

  1. Never apologize.

If the conversation begins with, “I’m sorry to be asking you this but…” then you shouldn’t be making the ask. Why would you insult a prospective donor by apologizing for asking? If the cause is not worthy of their donation, then you shouldn’t be requesting it. Before making an ask, consider why you have made a contribution (if you haven’t make a contribution, see #1). Why is this cause important and how will it benefit the church’s mission? Instead of apologizing, you should be conveying the transformational nature of the mission for which you are requesting funds. Begin by sharing your excitement about how this project will result in the advancement of God’s vision for your church.

  1. Don’t downplay expectations.

Asking people to give a little something will result in a little gift. Big visions require committed leadership and, often, significant resources. Donors want to know what it will take to make the project successful and what you want from them. If you sugar coat your ask in an attempt to be more polite, your donor will be confused, frustrated, and likely uninvolved. Be sure to prepare for your conversation in advance and let the donor know exactly what is planned, what is needed, and how you are asking them to respond.

  1. Engage people in prayer.

As Christ’s disciples, we believe generous giving is a crucial component of the discipleship path. As stewards of God’s gifts, we believe God is the giver of all blessings and it is up to us to determine how God would have us use them. Donors should be encouraged to pray about how to use the resources God has provided, and regardless of the size of the gift, listening for God’s leading is vital to the ask.

  1. Make it about the donor.

If you don’t read any of the other 5, please read this one carefully. Be sure you prepare well in advance and understand the donor’s wishes. What are the donor’s passions? What other causes does the donor support? How will this gift fulfill the donor’s philanthropic desires? Give careful consideration to whether the request is appropriate for the donor. Is the amount being requested within the scope of what the donor is able or willing to consider? Has the donor made similar gifts in the past to you or to another organization?

 

If you have the right attitude and are well prepared, the ask should be a time of celebration. The ask is an opportunity to connect eager donors with projects that meet their philanthropy goals. If you’ve done your job well, they will thank you for the opportunity to be a part of it.

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